A good childhood for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

Julian Pocock, Director Public Policy & Practice Development
Julian Pocock, Director Public Policy & Practice Development

In 2007, Ampe Akelyernemane Meke Mekarle – or the Little Children Are Sacred Report – exposed the complexity and shame of sexual abuse of Aboriginal children in the Northern Territory.

Constant media focus on child abuse in the NT followed. Daily reports in The Australian newspaper and nightly stories on ABC’s Lateline.

They covered, paedophile rings, chronic neglect, kids sniffing petrol, kids roaming the streets day and night and the sexual abuse of kids, including kids abusing other kids. All fueled by a daily diet of pornography and alcohol.

Shocking, awful stuff. Hard to digest, hard to think about and harder to know where to start. But, in time, easy to ignore.

With the 2007 Federal Election looming, the NT intervention was announced in response to this ‘national emergency’.

Just after another election, it’s a good time to ask – has childhood improved for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children?

I’m not sure.

Media stories of neglect and abuse continue. Negative images of Aboriginal kids and families dominate.

Take a look at this photo of a two year old Aboriginal girl from NT in a News.com.au article.

What’s your first thought when you look at it?

At first glance it’s hard not to think she’s been punched.

I had to ask myself, why was that my first thought?

Are we getting any better at providing kids like this with a good childhood?

1 thought on “A good childhood for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children”

  1. Thanks for this important post Julian, looking at current statistics it would be hard to say we are.

    For anyone interested in issues affecting Aboriginal childhoods, Professor Muriel Bamblett, CEO of the Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency (VACCA), will give a keynote address at The Good Childhood Conference on Friday October 11th at 9.25am, entitled Is childhood improving for Aboriginal Children?.

    To find out more and register visit http://www.goodchildhood.org.au, follow the Berry Street Childhood Institute on Twitter @childhoodinst or leave a comment below.

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