Strengthening child wellbeing through place-based approaches

 

Society and the government are facing a variety of social problems, such as obesity, and service systems that are intended to help families and children are struggling to meet the needs of the most disadvantaged.

Dr Tim Moore, a Senior Research Fellow of the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, highlights that not understanding why the problem exists makes addressing the problem more difficult. Due to the complex nature of social problems, Dr Moore argues that evidence-based programs are not capable of making sustained changes.

A person’s health aGoodChildhood 2013_045nd well-being is influenced by the local social environment and the built environment. Hence, it is argued that consequential strangers matter; that is, connections with people in the broader social hierarchy other than family or close friends. To not have contact with consequential strangers can be considered corrosive to a person’s health and well-being.

And so, in poorer communities, building social capital can be a more effective way of promoting children’s welfare due to what flows across from people in connection networks.

Problems which are multi-factored need to be worked on in an organic way. Thus, a place-based approach which includes community engagement and regular monitoring and feedback stands a better chance of being successful.

Post written by a youth blogger from SYN Media.

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