Berry Street Education – Pt. 1

Pt 1 in a series on Berry Street Education 

StudyingBerry Street Education seeks to:

  • Advance models of secondary schools to meet the needs of educationally disadvantaged / disengaged young people with a history of trauma, abuse or neglect.
  • Bring together three fields of research:

o   trauma-informed

o   neurodevelopmental

o   positive psychology/education, uniting them in a strong culture of academic achievement.

  • Inform the teaching practice of vulnerable children through this integrated approach in a continuum of school settings.

Cognitive & Non-Cognitive Skills at the Berry Street School:  CHARACTER COUNTS

At Berry Street, our knowledge of trauma’s impact on our students’ development guides our education program design. We seek to understand and undertake a bold next step to our curriculum development and school culture: the integration of our knowledge of trauma’s impact on neurodevelopment along with the best practices around the sciences of well-being, human flourishing and positive psychology.

Our students come to us with histories of education neglect, substance abuse, generational trauma, and a great deal of personal struggle.  We seek to create dual-purpose educational experiences: building both cognitive skills and strengths-based resilience.

We know that for our Berry Street students to succeed in school, in transitional career pathways and beyond, we must teach a mosaic of both cognitive and non-cognitive skills.   We define cognitive skills as the skills necessary to understand and process information—the foundational academic skills for literacy, maths, inquiry-based learning, vocational knowledge and electronic media.

Post written by Tom Brunzell, Berry Street Childhood Institute Senior Advisor, Teaching & Learning. 

Thanks SYN Media!

We trust you’ve been enjoying reading posts about our Good Childhood conference over the past seven months.

Just to recap, a group of young people from SYN Media attended the conference and we have been sharing their descriptions of keynote and other presentations ever since. The youth bloggers wrote a total of 35 posts!

We want to thank SYN and the bloggers for their amazing contribution to the success of our conference. Their posts provide us with a terrific public record of the key conference themes.

And along the way, they posed important questions which have helped to keep alive the conversation about a good childhood.

It is also important to take this opportunity to recognise the value of youth led organisations like SYN Media. Melvin Delgado and Lee Staples talk about the benefits to both the young people who participate and the wider community of youth-led organisations.

Our conference was a case in point. We believe our message was strengthened by the inclusion of young people’s voices and we certainly hope the young bloggers gained valuable work experience and extended their skills. A win-win for all of us!

Future of the Good Childhood Blog

You may have noticed that that The Good Childhood Conference blog has been renamed the Good Childhood blog.

From now on we will be using this blog to discuss issues related to the Berry Street Childhood Institute’s aims. These posts will be part of our plan to bring about:

  • Increased understanding and awareness of what sustains a good childhood; and
  • Wider and more effective action directed at the amelioration of adverse childhood experiences.

Stay tuned for posts from Berry Street Childhood Institute staff, Associates and Fellows (many of whom are international experts in their fields!), as well as from other guest bloggers and even young people themselves!

 

Post by: Marg Hamley, Director Berry Street Childhood Institute

 

 

Imaginate: discovering what makes a good childhood

Imaginate_blog

We’re smack bang in the middle of the entry period for Imaginate, our national multimedia competition for young Australians (13-25). As we receive the entrants’ photographs, stories, poems, videos, music, fashion design and drawings, we’re gradually building a picture of what a good childhood should look like, from the perspective of young people themselves.

So, why do we care?

Well, firstly we care because we feel really strongly that young people are experts on modern childhoods:

  • They have the recent experience, which gives them first-hand knowledge;
  • Just enough time has passed that they can be objective about the whole of childhood, without getting bogged down in the detail of whether a Barbie makes a childhood better than an Xbox;
  • And, they have the skills and creativity to communicate their beliefs and opinions in ways that resonate with a wide audience.

Secondly, we care because what young people have to say about good childhood will be one of the major foundations of how we, at the Berry Street Childhood Institute, approach our work.

And finally, Imaginate matters because we want to see a critical mass of young Australians stepping up to make change happen for childhood, and for the issues that matter to them.Imaginate pic

What better way to start than with a little creative thinking…

Visit the Imaginate site to enter the competition and vote on current entries! http://imaginate.org.au/, or for more information like Imaginate on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Post by: Lauren Oliver, Youth Engagement Coordinator

Youth Report – The Good Childhood Conference (Part One)

 

Youth facilitators at Conference
CREATE Youth facilitators at Conference

In a series of blog posts we will be reflecting on our new understandings of youth participation after The Good Childhood Conference, as well as some of the feedback we received from conference delegates. We will also report back on practical elements of our youth participation strategy.

Below are some of our initial reflections on the experience, specifically the usefulness of the youth consultations and social media in preparation for the conference.

In regards to youth participation at the conference, we aimed to actively include young people in the conversation about what sustains a good childhood and how we best support those who have not experienced a good childhood. (For more information on our approach, check out our Principles of Youth Participation on the Berry Street Childhood Institute website).

As you may remember, three youth consultants worked with us to engage in a broader consultation with young people about what would create a conference that was engaging and attractive to young people.

Over a two month period the youth consultants met with approximately 80 young people and gathered considerable feedback about what young people would or wouldn’t like.

Outcomes of the Youth Consultations:

  • Received feedback about what young people would or wouldn’t like at a conference,
  • Promoted the event in face-to-face sessions with young people,
  • Provided three youth consultants with workplace training,
  • Collected data to drive our youth-friendly activities,
  • Provided motivation for the youth consultants to volunteer at the conference, displaying increased leadership qualities – they also brought their friends,
  • Developed/improved relationships with community groups, schools, youth groups and clients of Berry Street,
  • Provided a barometer of youth interest in the conference.

“The youth consultation process has been a positive but challenging experience for me. It put me out of my comfort zone and has helped me improve on my networking and organisation skills.” Laura, Youth Consultant

Promoting Youth Participation
During the youth consultations young people told us that they like to communicate via social media. In the lead up to the conference an 8 week social media strategy was planned in order to promote numerous speaker profiles, interesting topics and reminders about the conference on Twitter and Facebook. Information about youth scholarships offered was posted regularly.

To provide some idea, detailed below are the most popular (shared and/or ‘Liked’) Facebook posts on the Berry Street Childhood Institute page in the lead up to the conference:
789 – Muriel Bamblett August 2013
452 – Youth scholarships announced September 2013
419 – Conference post after day one October 2013
165 – Launch of the conference program August 2013
158 – Kaff-iene the street artist August 2013

Youth participation was also publicised on the conference website, here on the conference blog and in the program. Positive feedback was received about the information available.

Stay tuned for more reflections on youth participation in the coming weeks…

The Conference is done: what now?

Packed Celebrity Room at the Conference
Participants packed into the Celebrity Room at the Conference to hear from keynote speakers

We were thrilled with the success of our inaugural The Good Childhood Conference. I know you can’t judge success by numbers but here are a few statistics:

  • Over the 3 days of the conference (starting with the pre-conference workshops) we had 1000 people in attendance;
  • During the two day conference there were 64 presentations & activities, including: 8 keynote addresses, 10 keynote presentations, 40 concurrent sessions, 2 performances, 1 youth panel, 1 youth led workshop, 1 football skills drill, and 1 book launch;
  • 63 young people and 25 foster carers attended the conference on scholarships;
  • There were 18 displays and exhibitors, as well as a street artist creating a work in front of our eyes;
  • We were supported by 7 sponsors, 22 supporting partners and many friends of the conference who provided scholarships for young people and carers.

Presenters and delegates alike have been very positive in their feedback and we thank you for your encouragement.

In holding the conference we were seeking to explore what sustains a good childhood and how we can best support those who have not experienced a good childhood and we are keen to understand whether we met this aim.

We are currently analysing delegates’ evaluation forms and will be sending out a survey to those who attended to obtain further information to assist us with future planning. Watch this blog to find out about some of the themes from this feedback.

What happens now?
One of the unique features of The Good Childhood conference was the presence of young people from SYN Media who attended all of the keynote and a range of other sessions, commenting on conference themes on twitter and drafting blog posts which we will share over the coming weeks.

This blog is going to become a permanent fixture for the Berry Street Childhood Institute as we encourage you all to engage in this conversation about what we want for children in Australia in the 21st century.

Why don’t you enter this conversation right now by commenting here? Otherwise get involved on Twitter at @ChildhoodInst.

Thanks to all of you who participated in any way at our conference!

The time has arrived – let the Conference begin!

Follow the Good Childhood Conference live on Twitter!
Follow the Good Childhood Conference live on Twitter!

Those of us who are organising The Good Childhood Conference are feeling a mixture of excitement and anxiety (to be honest, terror) as our conference becomes a reality with pre-workshops on today and the conference starting tomorrow, Thursday 11 October.

Now if only we had listened to one of our keynote speakers, Robert Hart from the Resilience Institute, and “ejected stress” and “sustained our energy”!

The pre-conference workshops are seeing three of our conference speakers engaging participants in sessions about drumming, resilience and client case studies respectively.

This breadth of topics reflects the diversity of sessions we’ll be offering at the conference itself over the next two days.

So if you are attending the conference, we are really looking forward to your participation and hope you will join us in the conversation about a good childhood.

We encourage you to follow the seminars and discussions on social media, whether you are able to attend the conference or not.

Young people from SYN Media will be reporting on what they are hearing from our presenters on Twitter so you will be able to keep up with the content and respond to the key themes. The conference hash tag and key accounts are:

  1. #GCConf, follow this hash tag to see all Tweets relevant to the conference and each seminar,
  2. @ChildhoodInst, Tweeting highlights from the SYN Media Tweeters attending each seminar,
  3. @LiveSYN, covering the conference keynotes and seminars live.

After the conference we will be constantly updating this blog with posts written on most of the keynotes, seminars and worshops.

This way, we can let you know in more detail about what our presenters had to say about a good childhood – how it can be sustained and what we need to do for those who have not had a good childhood.

Again, we would be really pleased if you could comment on the blog so we know what you are thinking.

Here’s to a successful and dynamic conference!

Pictures of You

Brian Nankervis
Brian Nankervis (centre) on ‘Pictures of You’ with two of his special guests, comedians/ actors Anh Do and Shane Jacobson.

Without seeking to trivialise our conference aims, we don’t believe conversations about a Good Childhood should be restricted to earnest or academic exchanges.

After all, we all hope that childhood involves a good measure of fun and creativity.

We plan to end The Good Childhood Conference on a positive and entertaining note with a perspective on the good childhood theme from Brain Nankervis.

Brian is a Melbourne based performer, writer and producer who is probably best known as co-host of the popular SBS music trivia series ‘RocKwiz’.

In 2012 Brian hosted the talk show ‘Pictures of You’ on Channel 7. Guests were invited into the studio armed with their family photo collections and encouraged to reminisce about their early life.

At our conference, Brain will recreate this format with two of our presenters who will share some childhood photos and in the process, tell us something about who they are today.

If you go further back into Brian’s history as a performer, you might recall his regular appearances on Hey Hey It’s Saturday as the tortured street poet Raymond J Bartholomeuz.

We can’t promise you any poems but Brian is a consummate storyteller and he’s bound to whimsically and poignantly share something of his own childhood.

We hope to see you on Friday afternoon for a delightful end to a stimulating, possibly challenging conference program!

See Brian’s touching interview with “The Happiest Refugee” Anh Do below,