Creating a soothing new household rhythm in uncertain times

Predictable activities, rhythms and routines make children and young people feel more secure, safer and cared for. With a little bit of planned structure, children are less likely to feel caught unawares. They will know what to expect.

This is especially important for children in out-of-home care who may be more likely to feel that the world is an unsafe place.

In the current COVID-19 situation with no school and big changes to their daily lives, many children, carers and families are struggling to find a new and reassuring rhythm to their days.

Continue reading “Creating a soothing new household rhythm in uncertain times”

International delegation visits Take Two

By Allison Cox, Director, Berry Street – Take Two

A group of our international colleagues recently came from Norway to spend time with Berry Street’s Take Two service.

The RVTS Sør (South) service is a Norwegian government-funded domestic violence, sexual abuse, traumatic stress, migrant/refugee health and suicide prevention resource centre and training service. They have a special focus on working with children and families.

Continue reading “International delegation visits Take Two”

Playing to her strengths

Not much is known about Elle’s* first year. Her Mum has severe mental health problems and has lots of problems with drugs and drinking.

Elle was removed by Child Protection services from her mother around the time she turned one.

Her father immigrated from Asia. Growing up we suspect he experienced significant trauma during the long civil war in his country. Elle’s father didn’t know about Elle until after she was removed and placed into foster care. When he found out, she went to live with him together with his new partner Trisha.

Continue reading “Playing to her strengths”

Helping children regulate their bodies and their minds

by Toni Heron, Senior Occupational Therapy Consultant, Take Two – Berry Street

Berry Street’s Take Two service has recently undertaken a three-year Occupational Therapy research study assessing the sensory processing patterns of the children and young people we work with. The results are partially what we expected, but there were some surprising findings also. Continue reading “Helping children regulate their bodies and their minds”

“Essential reading” – Berry Street’s Take Two makes it into CHOICE

Berry Street’s Take Two service has been internationally recognised for its contribution to academic literature about developmental trauma and our clinical use of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT).

Continue reading ““Essential reading” – Berry Street’s Take Two makes it into CHOICE”

Learning to trust through play

By Jen Willis, Communications Consultant, Berry Street – Take Two  

Learning to talk, walk and play have been bigger achievements for Kassie than for most kids.

When Kassie entered foster care as a toddler, she was severely developmentally delayed and clearly malnourished. She couldn’t walk or talk.  She couldn’t hold eye contact and didn’t know how to play. She vomited 40 to 50 times a day, every single day but for no obvious medical reason.

Continue reading “Learning to trust through play”

Using neuroscience to understand why some young people offend

By Jen Willis, Communications Consultant, Berry Street – Take Two 

A Judge and some magistrates now have a better understanding of developmental trauma and neglect, and how they might impact the behaviours of the young people they are sentencing.

Berry Street’s Take Two program recently delivered professional development for the South Australian Youth Court. The Court deals with children facing criminal charges, as well as child protection cases.

Continue reading “Using neuroscience to understand why some young people offend”

Speech pathology and why it’s needed in Take Two

By Jen Willis, Communications Consultant, Berry Street – Take Two

Monica has recently joined Berry Street’s Take Two service as our Senior Speech Pathologist.

It’s thought that at least half of the children and young people we work with have communications difficulties. This can contribute to feelings of anxiety and frustration that might lead to social isolation, aggression or depression when they can’t understand what others are telling them or express themselves properly.

Continue reading “Speech pathology and why it’s needed in Take Two”

What is education worth?

By Joseph Thomas, Ph.D. Candidate, College of Business, Law & Governance – James Cook University. Joseph will be presenting at the Doing School Differently conference in Melbourne on 15th–16th September.


What is the dollar value of education?

You can’t put a price on education? Tell that to the educators across the country under the gun to prove the economic benefits of their work. It’s strange, really. We don’t often demand that doctors prove the worth of their contribution…

Then again, we economists love to put price tags on things. Nature, life-satisfaction, the Year 12 completion certificate.

So what is education worth? Well, it might depend on whose education we’re talking about. Continue reading “What is education worth?”

Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics

Dr Bruce D PerryOur second day with Dr. Perry gave us an opportunity to delve deeper into the theory underlying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) and its application as a framework for clinicians to use and apply their own skills or training to. It also gave us a chance to hear from practitioners from around Australia about the application of the NMT in a variety of local settings. Continue reading “Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics”

Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Today we were thrilled to present Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ workshop in Melbourne. It was an inspiring, thought-provoking day that delivered a wealth of insights for the audience to apply to their practice. In this post, we share some of our highlights from the day.

In the beginning of the presentation, Dr. Perry explained the complexity of the human brain. One of the fundamental principles about the brain is that it develops sequentially, from the simplest parts to the most complex. The cortex, which controls higher reasoning, isn’t fully developed until people reach their early 30s. The brain also processes information sequentially – the lower, less complex parts have ‘first dibs’ on incoming information. This has significant implications for how we respond to stress.

“Part of what we know about the brain is that we don’t know that much about the brain”

Continue reading “Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry”

Developing a national Trauma Informed Practice framework

Berry Street believes that an important priority for the next three year action plan, as part of the National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children, should be the development of a national Trauma Informed Practice framework.

Julian Pocock
Director Public Policy & Practice Development

Over the last two decades strong evidence has been established of the impacts of childhood trauma arising from exposure to maltreatment, abuse, neglect and violence on healthy human development, and the need for children and young people to receive effective support to heal and recover from trauma.

We know more about the way trauma affects brain development, the consequences for the capacity of children to form healthy relationships with secure attachments and the behavioural challenges that traumatised children and young people present within their families, their broader network of relationships and within service settings from maternal and child health, early learning and care services, schools and the out-of-home care system.

In more recent years child and family welfare service systems have sought to respond to this evidence by developing ‘trauma informed’ policy, program and practice initiatives to support children and young people to recover and heal from childhood trauma.

Continue reading “Developing a national Trauma Informed Practice framework”