Wellbeing Workout Part 1

Jo Mitchell, The Mind Room & AFL Players Association
Jo Mitchell, The Mind Room & AFL Players Association

 

There are micro-moments of joy that can really create significant change over time.

 

This double workshop was jam-packed with interactive activities, great tips for maintaining wellbeing, and plenty of information on mental and physical health. It was so full of great ideas that the blog post will be in two parts.

It began by getting the audience members into pairs and having them complete a five-step workout:
1. Stand up and have a stretch
2. Notice what’s going on – thoughts, physical feelings, emotional feelings, etc.
3. Introduce yourself to your partner, and share something you’re looking forward to
4. Draw a portrait of the other person you see in 30 seconds – except that once the pen hits the paper you can’t look at the paper again, and must keep your eyes on the other person
5. Give your portrait to the other person

Jo explained that this was conducive with the Five Ways to Wellbeing, a workout incorporating over 500 studies. It is based on the human experience of maintaining wellbeing:
1. Being able to move
2. Tuning in (to notice thing, acknowledging the importance of mindfulness)
3. To connect with others (one of the strongest predictors of wellbeing)
4. To learn
5. To give

Jo explained that we tend to,as people, pay attention to the negatives in our life much more easily than to the positives. What we payattention impacts our performance in every day life, and therefore, our wellbeing.GoodChildhood 2013_401

Jo then spoke about positive psychology – this is changing the perception of people, by seeking what is right in their lives rather than what is wrong. This not a complete therapy, nor a traditional approach to mental health, or a ‘Pollyanna’ (always happy) approach – instead it just aims to re-focus the subject on a more positive aspect of their lives.

Post written by a youth blogger from SYN Media.

Foster change by building hope

Maddie Witter“You can fail, and need to fail, in order to be a hopeful person.”

Maddie Witter gave an inspiring and motivating workshop today on building hope amongst youth in order to foster change.

The tools bestowed amongst the crowd were suitable for any person looking to increase their own hopefulness and success, but Maddie kept it aimed at young, disadvantaged and marginalised youth.

Maddie believes that in order for youth to be successful, they must achieve hope, persistence, and self-efficacy. If you can teach you these skills they can take these attributes and apply them to the rest of their lives.

“Self-efficacy is the ability to create a goal and then measure the progress of meeting that goal through reflection,” says Maddie.

Foster change by building hope

She then goes on to explain that persistence can be achieved through building stamina. This can be done through such strategies as:

  • Developing a list of things to do (not too long),
  • Predict how efficient you will be in completing a task, then measure it,
  • Control and cultivate choice in the curriculum without giving too many options,
  • Take 10 minutes twice a month to go through a calendar and see what you have achieved and still have to organise.

Maddie believes that anybody is capable of tremendous academic potential, and has experienced and developed firsthand the tools required to build hope among youth in order to foster change.

Reading Without LimitsFor more information on Maddie and her work, see her the website for her book http://reading-without-limits.com/, or follow her on Twitter @Maddie_Witter.

Post written by a youth blogger from SYN Media.