Creating a soothing new household rhythm in uncertain times

Predictable activities, rhythms and routines make children and young people feel more secure, safer and cared for. With a little bit of planned structure, children are less likely to feel caught unawares. They will know what to expect.

This is especially important for children in out-of-home care who may be more likely to feel that the world is an unsafe place.

In the current COVID-19 situation with no school and big changes to their daily lives, many children, carers and families are struggling to find a new and reassuring rhythm to their days.

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Yarning to create a better future

Berry Street’s Take Two service is working to reduce the impacts of developmental and intergenerational trauma with some of our most vulnerable children.

Belinda Blundell is a member of Take Two’s Aboriginal Team and works with children in East Gippsland.

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How culture helped a child find his voice

By Jen Willis, Communications Consultant, Berry Street – Take Two

Lots of 7-years-olds wouldn’t be able to tell the difference between a moth and a butterfly. But Jay can.

Jay is an Aboriginal child going to a local primary school in suburban Melbourne. But unlike the others in his class, he has only just started talking.

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“Essential reading” – Berry Street’s Take Two makes it into CHOICE

Berry Street’s Take Two service has been internationally recognised for its contribution to academic literature about developmental trauma and our clinical use of the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT).

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Speech pathology and why it’s needed in Take Two

By Jen Willis, Communications Consultant, Berry Street – Take Two

Monica has recently joined Berry Street’s Take Two service as our Senior Speech Pathologist.

It’s thought that at least half of the children and young people we work with have communications difficulties. This can contribute to feelings of anxiety and frustration that might lead to social isolation, aggression or depression when they can’t understand what others are telling them or express themselves properly.

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Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics

Dr Bruce D PerryOur second day with Dr. Perry gave us an opportunity to delve deeper into the theory underlying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) and its application as a framework for clinicians to use and apply their own skills or training to. It also gave us a chance to hear from practitioners from around Australia about the application of the NMT in a variety of local settings. Continue reading “Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics”

Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Today we were thrilled to present Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ workshop in Melbourne. It was an inspiring, thought-provoking day that delivered a wealth of insights for the audience to apply to their practice. In this post, we share some of our highlights from the day.

In the beginning of the presentation, Dr. Perry explained the complexity of the human brain. One of the fundamental principles about the brain is that it develops sequentially, from the simplest parts to the most complex. The cortex, which controls higher reasoning, isn’t fully developed until people reach their early 30s. The brain also processes information sequentially – the lower, less complex parts have ‘first dibs’ on incoming information. This has significant implications for how we respond to stress.

“Part of what we know about the brain is that we don’t know that much about the brain”

Continue reading “Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry”