Root of youth riots demand, not management

By Dr Sarah Wise, University of Melbourne and Berry Street Good Childhood Fellow.

Spectacular incident and response scenes at the Parkville youth justice precinct have sparked a lot of talk in the community on how to manage serious and violent acting-out behavior and offending by a small number of young people in Victoria. Predictably, the voice of ‘tough on crime’ populism has been at high volume.

Before we snap to punitive responses, it’s worth understanding the true complexity behind these events and youth crime more generally, as well as the systemic approach to youth justice that we have in place already. Continue reading “Root of youth riots demand, not management”

Flexible learning helps students with disadvantages finish school

Despite encouragement from federal, state and territory governments to complete school – and a legal obligation to “learn or earn” – one in five young Australians still leaves school before the end of Year 12.

By Kitty Te Riele, Victoria University

Despite encouragement from federal, state and territory governments to complete school – and a legal obligation to “learn or earn” – one in five young Australians still leaves school before the end of Year 12.

Evidence about early school leavers in Australia demonstrates they are disproportionately drawn from disadvantaged backgrounds, including low-socioeconomic backgrounds, Indigenous backgrounds and regional and remote areas. Continue reading “Flexible learning helps students with disadvantages finish school”

What is education worth?

By Joseph Thomas, Ph.D. Candidate, College of Business, Law & Governance – James Cook University. Joseph will be presenting at the Doing School Differently conference in Melbourne on 15th–16th September.


What is the dollar value of education?

You can’t put a price on education? Tell that to the educators across the country under the gun to prove the economic benefits of their work. It’s strange, really. We don’t often demand that doctors prove the worth of their contribution…

Then again, we economists love to put price tags on things. Nature, life-satisfaction, the Year 12 completion certificate.

So what is education worth? Well, it might depend on whose education we’re talking about. Continue reading “What is education worth?”

Full Engagement: Our Young People Deserve Our Best

Young people deserve educators at their best, who can foster the capacity and willingness for full engagement in their school achievement.

By Tom Brunzell, Senior Advisor Education at the Berry Street Childhood Institute

Flexible Learning Options (FLO) provide young people a second chance to become the people they hope to be. Often, our young people can feel blamed for their own “lack of willingness” to engage, yet we know there are many systemic factors that require them to seek specialised pathways such as FLO.

As educators and allied professionals, we represent a systemic movement that believes that we, as a society, owe these young people educational opportunities to succeed. It is our responsibility to hold ourselves to account to provide best practice and high professional expectations for ourselves as we support our students and their futures. Continue reading “Full Engagement: Our Young People Deserve Our Best”

What makes a good childhood: Pre-pregnancy

We know that the foundations for a good childhood start well before conception. This may seem a little strange at first, but there are a number of key domains that are important for the future child to have functioning well enough in their prospective parents.

By Dr. Nicole Milburn, Senior Manager for Infant Mental Health and Developmental Consultancies, Take Two

Some of you might remember from my guest blog in late July that I promised to write a series of posts about the importance of a good infancy for a good childhood.

In the meantime I have been diverted by other Institute activities, not least of which was the national speaking tour of Dr. Bruce D. Perry, Child Psychiatrist and Neuroscientist. Dr. Perry and his colleagues at the ChildTrauma Academy have made an enormous contribution to our understanding of the impact of trauma on development. They have clearly articulated that the brain develops in a sequential way, from the most primitive functions to the most complex. This means it is vital that we understand what happens and when it happens within the timeline of the developing brain so that we can understand the impact of events and what to then do about it. This model also gives the appropriate emphasis on very early development as laying the foundation for life.

A couple pre-pregnancyWe know, however, that the foundations for a good childhood start well before conception. This may seem a little strange at first, but there are a number of key domains that are important for the future child to have functioning well enough in their prospective parents. Continue reading “What makes a good childhood: Pre-pregnancy”

Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics

Dr Bruce D PerryOur second day with Dr. Perry gave us an opportunity to delve deeper into the theory underlying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics (NMT) and its application as a framework for clinicians to use and apply their own skills or training to. It also gave us a chance to hear from practitioners from around Australia about the application of the NMT in a variety of local settings. Continue reading “Insights from Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s Masterclass on Applying the Neurosequential Model of Therapeutics”

Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Dr. Bruce D. Perry

Today we were thrilled to present Dr. Bruce D. Perry’s ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ workshop in Melbourne. It was an inspiring, thought-provoking day that delivered a wealth of insights for the audience to apply to their practice. In this post, we share some of our highlights from the day.

In the beginning of the presentation, Dr. Perry explained the complexity of the human brain. One of the fundamental principles about the brain is that it develops sequentially, from the simplest parts to the most complex. The cortex, which controls higher reasoning, isn’t fully developed until people reach their early 30s. The brain also processes information sequentially – the lower, less complex parts have ‘first dibs’ on incoming information. This has significant implications for how we respond to stress.

“Part of what we know about the brain is that we don’t know that much about the brain”

Continue reading “Insights from ‘Transforming Childhood Trauma’ with Dr. Bruce D. Perry”